London Beer Factory, Beyond the Pale

London Beer Factory, Beyond the Pale

Pale Ale, 4.2% ABV Featured in main subscription box on 5 October 2017. Today’s beer comes in a 360° can, which means the whole top comes off. Drinking from the can just got a lot easier! Find the brewery on Twitter at @ldnbeerfactory and on Instagram also at @ldnbeerfactory Serving temperature Serve this beer at 7°C to 10°C; this means at …

pale ale

What to expect from… a Pale Ale

Think of this as IPAs little brother if you like. It has a similar pale appearance and refreshing character with malts and hops in good balance, but it’s all pitched at a gentler level. It should pour a pale golden to light amber colour with a good head of white foam. It should range from clear to slightly hazy. Any …

kölsch

What to expect from… a Kölsch

Kölsch is a bit of an inbetweener. It’s an ale that thinks its a lager – or maybe that’s the other way around. Expect brilliant clarity, a golden colour and a creamy white head. So far so lager, right? But when you smell it you should find some fruitiness there. It’s brewed with an ale yeast and has the characteristic …

how to taste beer

How to taste beer like an expert

Sometimes you just want to drink a beer. It’s one of life’s simple pleasures. Not every beer has to be deconstructed and captured in a notebook. There are times though when you might want to slow down and consider the beer you’re drinking in a little more depth. What follows is my guide on how to taste beer, and how …

beer colour

Describing beer colour: how to get it right

Beer colour is important. It’s one of the first things we notice. Our eyes usually get involved with our drinks long before our noses or mouths do. And this happens whether we’re conscious of it or not. If you’re down the pub you may be looking at your pint and licking your lips, thinking damn that looks good. If you’re …

Rauchbier

What to expect from… a Rauchbier

Smoky beers are pretty unusual these days. However before 1700 or so they would have been much more common. So what changed? It’s all to do with the malt and how it’s dried. The smoke aroma comes from the wood used to kiln the malt. Before the invention of direct-fire kilns all malt would either have been smoky or air-dried. …